quadz4lyfe
jujubee58:

queertrees:

geekygothgirl:

verycuriousnocure:

During World War II, Josephine Baker served with the French Red Cross and was an active member of the French resistance movement. Using her career as a cover Baker became an intelligence agent, carrying secret messages written in invisible ink on her sheet music. She was awarded the Croix de Guerre, and received a Medal of the Resistance in 1946. In 1961 she received the highest French honor, the Legion d’Honneur awarded by then President Charles de Gaulle.
Our loss, U.S.A….

If you don’t admire the shit out of J. Baker, who was also pretty openly bisexual and adopted NINETEEN children in addition to the badassery mentioned above, I want you to go sit in the corner and think about your life choices.

um she was also a huge civil rights activist and her refusal to perform for segregated audiences at major clubs that were fallin over themselves to book her helped de-segregate vegas performance venues
aaaand she had a pet cheetah

The best thing she ever did was leave the US

jujubee58:

queertrees:

geekygothgirl:

verycuriousnocure:

During World War II, Josephine Baker served with the French Red Cross and was an active member of the French resistance movement. Using her career as a cover Baker became an intelligence agent, carrying secret messages written in invisible ink on her sheet music. She was awarded the Croix de Guerre, and received a Medal of the Resistance in 1946. In 1961 she received the highest French honor, the Legion d’Honneur awarded by then President Charles de Gaulle.

Our loss, U.S.A….

If you don’t admire the shit out of J. Baker, who was also pretty openly bisexual and adopted NINETEEN children in addition to the badassery mentioned above, I want you to go sit in the corner and think about your life choices.

um she was also a huge civil rights activist and her refusal to perform for segregated audiences at major clubs that were fallin over themselves to book her helped de-segregate vegas performance venues

aaaand she had a pet cheetah

The best thing she ever did was leave the US

haneefistheonlyone

blackourstory:

SELLING AFRICANS WAS A WELL-PLANNED CAPITALIST VENTURE

the amount of detailed information that we have on who financed slave voyages, where they went, who they captured, which African leaders cooperated with which traders, how many trips they made, who captained and manned the ships, which companies insured the human cargo, how many Africans were expected to die during the voyage, what diseases they usually succumbed to while on-board, the ratio of human cargo to dry goods that would net the ship the highest profit margin, which countries dominated the trade during which decades, which countries ran illegal slave trading ships after the trade was supposed to be outlawed… NONE OF THAT IS A MYSTERY!

If you think that THE CASE FOR REPARATIONS for American Black people on slavery alone - not to mention all they endured AFTER - is absurd… think again! 

If your immediate thought is ”Who is going to pay whom?" or "Why am I responsible for what happened way back then?" or even "Why do those of us whose families came to America after 1865 even have to pay attention to this topic?”… then you need to educate yourself. Badly. 

Those aren’t necessarily dumb questions to ask… they’re simply THE WRONG QUESTIONS and really have nothing to do with what reparations is about. Not on the individual level, anyway. Do yourself a favor and if for no other reason than to be able to argue against reparations INTELLIGENTLY… READ THIS:

http://www.theatlantic.com/features/archive/2014/05/the-case-for-reparations/361631/

…because sounding dumb in the midst of the information age is not cool. especially on such a serious topic.

haneefistheonlyone

sixpenceee:

As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting.

Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive.

Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong.

In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding.

Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis.

These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition.

While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications.

SOURCE